Change, The Only Constant: 7 Strategies to Embrace Change at Work

by Mike Griffin on July 25, 2011

  • Share
  • Sharebar
  • Share
Change The Only Constant

Change The Only Constant

Change happening is the only thing that will never change.  Everything changes it is how society progresses although you may not think that progress is happening at the time.  Often looking back you can see how that change that you hated has improved your life.

Learning to accept change at work is critical to being successful in your career. Dealing with alterations to your normal work procedures can be frustrating, unwanted, and even scary, but change can bring many positive elements to an active working environment.

What can you do to welcome change at your job with confidence and an adventuresome spirit?

Consider these suggestions to guide you towards embracing workplace changes with optimism:

  1. Why do you feel negatively about the change? Ask yourself what scares you or makes you angry about a recent change at work. Explore all the possibilities.
  • List your concerns. Maybe you think your job or paycheck is threatened. Perhaps you think the company might close because of the change. Think through these concerns.
  • If you find that your concerns are legitimate, create a Plan B that you can implement in your worst-case scenarios.
  • Once you make an action plan, let go of anxieties about situations you can’t control and optimistically expect the best results that could happen from the change.
  1. Remind yourself those in charge have good reasons for the change. You must trust that the people running the company are making the choice to change for a reason that will benefit the company.
  • Recognize that people in power have a picture of the entire situation. They have information that you might not have.
  1. Help reduce workplace negativity about the change. Avoid lengthy discussions with co-workers about changes in the workplace, especially if your peers are focusing on negativity related to the changes.
  • Some co-workers might be especially antagonistic about upcoming changes due to their own fears and insecurities. Realizing their less-than-positive comments spring from fear will help you refrain from participating in such conversations.
  • Make an effort to be understanding, but decline to share any thoughts that might be interpreted as negative about the changes.
  • Share thoughts about the positive results the change should bring.
  1. Accept the change as part of your job. Recognize that an important aspect of your work is to support the management and carry out your leaders’ directives.
  • Simplify the situation for yourself by pledging to respect the changes and perform your duties as required.
  1. Consider the new plans a challenge. Make a decision to face the change head-on and do whatever it takes to glean positive results from the new plans.
  • Show yourself that you can roll with the punches. The changes may even result in your adding some very important career experiences to your resume for the future.
  1. Have confidence that you can handle any change. Remind yourself that you strive for excellence in your work, regardless of the situation.
  2. Embrace the positive possibilities. Your work situation might actually improve because of the new changes. Even though it might take some time to experience, you’ll most likely see some positive results emerge from the adjustments in your work environment.
  • This could be a time of rejuvenation, renewal and newfound efficiency.
  • Be patient throughout the implementation process.
  • Allow yourself to expect your work situation to improve because of the changes.

Although changes at work might be scary and unwanted, open your mind to the possibilities of change. Put some of these strategies into practice if changes occur where you work. Yes, you can embrace change at work with positivity, confidence, and patience!

Be ready for and embrace change it is the only unchanging thing in your life.

Learn to use the law of attraction to embrace change.

 

Be Sociable, Share!

Previous post:

Next post: